March Sneak Peek

Boondoggle or Bona Fide? A Question on the Appalachian Cottontail By John Gibble Those of us born in the 1960s and 70s were the children that were going to save the planet. In school, we were versed in conservation of resources, promoting clean water, preserving forests, and reducing air pollution. We remember the pesticide, DDT and the effects it had on eagles and ospreys. Forty years later we are now celebrating the de-listing of...

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February Sneak Peek

Canine Anaplasmosis – A Tale of Two Bacteria By Luke Peterson, DVM Recently, one of our club members Keith Turnquist had a beagle treated for an acute Anaplasmosis infection. Anaplasmosis is a tick-borne disease, but is not as well-known to as many as Lyme disease. There are four predominant tick-borne bacterial infections in dogs: Lyme disease, Anaplasmosis, Ehrlichiosis, and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Central and Northern...

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January Sneak Peek

Preparing An Emergency First Aid Kit For Your Hound By Treyton Jai Diggs, DVM I was recently engaged in conversation with Mr. Jerry Wheat at Playtime Kennels and we were speaking of various things about hunting dogs. And we began to discuss how much of a risk we take every time we cast them into the woods whether it be to train them or to hunt them. So I asked myself, “What are some ways that I can help my fellow houndsmen to be...

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December Sneak Peek

The Four Sisters of the Deep South Part II By Troy Barber Last month, we did an extensive study of the pedigrees and history behind Chase’s Ace and Decker’s Tracking Pepper. In order to consistently breed great hounds, we must know what’s behind them, not just their names but also traits they possess both good and bad. Yes, even a blind hog will find an acorn now and then, but don’t count on lady luck to always be on your side. If you...

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August Sneak Peek

Mile Branch Sammy III by Troy Barber While looking back at these old hounds has been very rewarding and brought back many fond memories, it has also been very challenging to gather accurate statistics. Although I have lots of firsthand knowledge of these hounds, I don’t remember all the details such as field trial records and awards so I have to rely on their owners and other sources. Many of the owners of these hounds live near the...

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May Sneak Peek

Fescue, The Quiet Killer by Les Blondino Fescue was introduced into the United States from Europe. Dr. E. N. Fergus of the University of Kentucky first observed tall fescue growing in Menifer County, Kentucky in 1931. Dr. Fergus collected seed and tested it in various Kentucky locations. Eventually fescue was named Kentucky 31, referring to 1931 when Dr. Fergus first observed tall fescue. Fescue is hardy by nature and highly adaptive...

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