KENNEL HINTS 

(From January 1916)   D. Mansbarger & Son, Sabratan, West Virginia. 

 

Do Not Let Your Dog Hunt Garbage. 

If you live in or near a town or village you will find it very hard to get your young dog started on game as early as it should. The greatest drawback is the garbage lying around. If he finds garbage the first time you may set back two months or more. He has not yet learned what a rabbit is, but he does know what garbage is: his mind is constantly on it; you will notice him throw his head and sniff the air, away he goes–after garbage. You can whistle and call your head off–finally you go him only to have him leave few minutes later. If you have not had any experience training dogs you are very apt to give it up– condemn the dog, his breeding and who knows what not. To eliminate this is to put your dog on a lead and keep it on until you get away from all houses, roads, paths, etc. (feed be you start) where he can find nothing rabbit tracks; put him on a lead when you start for home. In surprisingly short time he will be working on game. A very good idea is to take an old trained dog along–one that is reliable slow, obedient and mute except when on the trail. This will give the pup encouragement which is valuable in his first lesson. Hardly no two men train their dogs alike, but the above can safely be applied without developing any of many bad faults, frequently acquired in a dog’s first training.

 

What wins in the Field Trials.

A great many people are deceived by superficial observation into believing that beagles win in the field trials by great speed only. Speed is a requisite, to be sure. If two dogs do the same work in starting and trailing their game and one does it more rapidly than the other, the former will win. But the real quality is the intense desire to find the rabbit, then trail it. This beats speed more often than is supposed. The intense hunting instinct, or desire to find rabbits tends always to increase speed and range.

 

Carbolic Acid a Poison.

Here’s a little tip that may save you the price of an automobile someday, especially if you breed any number of dogs in a year–don’t under any circumstances use carbolic acid as a disinfectant or for any other purpose, around dogs–they will pick it up in their food–the skin absorbs it fast as comes in contact with it. Often whole litters have been known to die apparently from an unknown cause–the real cause has been, they have licked the carbolic acid off their mother’s coat or got it in manv other ways. There are so many remedies, etc., on the market that have a large percentage of carbolic acid in their composition–that we hate to expose them. There is any number of substitutes that are as good or better and perfectly harmless to dog.

 

Mouth Disease.

Dogs are very often affected with a sort of growth in their mouth that resemble warts. They are spongy and will cover the whole mouth if not stopped. It is a contagious disease, that has no proper name that we know of. It is not dangerous if treated as follows: Have your druggist order one ounce Fluid Extract of Thuga, mix one-half teaspoonful with one teaspoon full of water; pour this in the dog’s mouth three times a day after feeding. Keep this up until they are granulated then wash the mouth twice daily with a weak solution of boric acid until healed. 

 

Author: dan

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